Day: April 12, 2011

Green Tea

Posted on Updated on

Green Tea Contributes to Weight Loss by Raising Metabolism

It sounds too good to be true: could green tea really help us to lose weight? In fact, studies show that the caffeine and polyphenols in green tea increase thermogenesis, the rate at which calories are burned, and therefore raises metabolism. Raising metabolism causes the body to burn more calories, which in turn can lead to weight loss. In addition, research indicates that green tea consumption activates a higher rate of fat oxidation, which can also help weight loss.

In a human study, participants taking green tea extract and still following a typical Western diet experienced a significant increase in their energy expenditure. The researchers concluded that participants using green tea extract had increased fat oxidation beyond what could be attributed to the caffeine they consumed. This indicates that green tea contains beneficial components that affect the body’s metabolism in such a way that favors weight loss.

In addition, researchers observed that participants using green tea extract did not have increased heart rate, suggesting that green tea may be an alternative to many stimulant based diet aids.

My source: http://www.cupofgreentea.com/green-tea-weight-loss.htm

Weight Loss Herbs

Posted on Updated on

Herbs That Increase Metabolism for Weight Loss

Some herbs act on digestion, metabolism, or appetite to impact weight loss. Certain substances can increase thermogenesis, or metabolism, which may lead to weight loss.

Certain thermogenic, or stimulant, herbs have a reputation for aiding weight loss, but according to the FDA should be avoided due to serious or possibly fatal side effects. Weight loss herbs to avoid include: ephedra (or products containing ephedra), which can have dangerous cardiac side effects, herbal laxatives such as cascara sagrada or senna, which can cause serious intestinal problems.

Featured Link: Green Tea and Weight Loss »

Herbs which may safely aid weight loss include the following:

» Cayenne contains a substance called capsaicin, which may stimulate digestion and increase metabolism and fat burning.
» Green tea contains caffeine and antioxidants that appear to stimulate metabolism.
» Seaweed, or kelp, is a natural thyroid stimulant, which may boost metabolism.
» Nettle is considered to be a thermogenic herb.
» Ginseng helps to boost energy and metabolism.

Anyone with problems or health conditions related to any of these herbs or their actions should not use them.

Hoodia Gordonii: “New” Herb for Weight Loss

The herb Hoodia gordonii (or just “Hoodia”) has gained recent attention as an aid for weight loss, due to its appetite suppressing actions. The plant grows in African desert regions, and has been used by the Kalahari San Bushmen for many hundreds of years.

Studies at Brown University indicate that Hoodia appears to work by interrupting or stopping the hunger mechanism in the brain. There is almost no research on the effectiveness of Hoodia as an herbal weight loss supplement, and no substantial information on its safety.

Diabetics should probably avoid Hoodia, because this herb “tricks” the brain into thinking that the body has sufficient blood sugar levels, which may interfere with the function of normal physiological processes that indicate when blood sugar is becoming dangerously low.

Fiber to Suppress Appetite

Taking soluble fiber supplements adds bulk and makes one feel full, but without any added calories. It is imperative to drink adequate water when using fiber supplements to avoid constipation and digestive problems, and fiber supplements should be taken under supervision of a health care professional. Foods high in soluble fiber include apples, oatmeal, beans, and pears.

My source: http://www.naturalweightlossweb.com/herbal-weight-loss.htm

Prosea Herbal

Posted on Updated on

1. Gatas-gatas (Euphorbia hirta L.)

Common names: Boto-botonis (Tagalog); maragatas (Ilokano); asthma herb.

Indications and preparations: Cigarettes from dried leaves and flowers for asthma; latex for warts and cuts.

2. Makahiya (Mimosa pudica L.)

Common names: Babain (Ilokano); huya-huya (Bisaya); torog-torog (Bikol); sensitive plant.

Indications and preparations: Decoction of whole plant diuretic, anti-asthma, wash for dermatitis.

3. Oregano (Plectranthus ambionicus (Lour.) Spreng.)

Common names: Suganda (Tagalog); country borage, Indian borage.

Indications and preparations: Leaf juice and decoction for asthma, cough; pounded leaves for insect bites, poultice for headache and gas pain.

4. Lagundi (Vitex negundo L.)

Common names: Dangla (Ilokano); five-leaved chaste tree, horseshoe vitex.

Indications and preparations: Leaves and flowering tops decoction, syrup, tablets and capsules for coughs, colds, fever and asthma.

Family: Verbenaceae
Description: A shedding shrub or small tree up to 8 m tall, bark surface slightly rough, peeling off in papery flakes, pale reddish-brown. Leaflets 3-5, narrowly elliptical Fruit spherical to broadly egg-shaped, 3-6 mm long, purple or black when mature.
Ecological distribution: Found in humid places or along watercourses, in waste places and mixed open forest. Eastern Africa and Madagascar to Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Burma (Myanmar), Indo-China, China, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, throughout the Malesian region, east to the Palau Islands, the Caroline Islands and the Mariana Islands. Widely cultivated in Europe, Asia, North America and the West Indies.
Parts used: Leaves and flowering tops.
Traditional uses: roots and leaves – for pain, bitter tonic, expectorant and diuretic;
sap from crushed leaves – for coughs and sore throat;
leaf decoction – for wounds, ulcers, aromatic baths, and internally to promote the flow of milk, to induce menstruation, against gastric colic, and against flatulence.
seeds – boiled and eaten to prevent the spread of toxins from poisonous bites of animals;
flowers – for diarrhea, cholera and liver disorders
Special precautions: Make sure to have the five-leaved varieties, as there are other varieties of lagundi.
Product available: Syrup, tablets and capsules.
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.

5. Sampaguita (Jasminum sambac (L.) Aiton)

Common names: Kampupot (general); manul (Bisaya); Arabian jasmine.

Indications and preparations: Infusion, steam inhalation of the fresh flowers for asthma and bronchitis.

6. Calamansi (Citrus microcarpa Bunge)

Common names: Bugarom (Bisaya).

Indications and preparations: Leaf decoction diuretic and anti-diabetic.

7. Dusol (Kaempferia galanga L.)

Common names: Gisol (general); disok (Ilokano); East Indian galangal.

Indications and preparations: Rhizome decoction for colds, headache, malaria.

8. Yerba Buena (Mentha cordifolia Opiz)

Common names: Herba buena, menta (general); marsh mint, mint leaves.

Indications and preparations: Tablets, capsules, tea for pain e.g. headache, toothache, arthritis; for cough, gaseous distention; pounded leaves, ointment for insect bites, colds.

9. Luya (Zingiber officinale Roscoe)

Common names: Luy-a (General); baseng (Ilokano); laya (Bikol); ginger, ginger root.

Indications and preparations: Rhizome decoction, lozenges, tea for colds, cough, sorethroat, and as carminative, and to relieve motion sickness; tincture, liniment for rheumatic complaints.

Family: Zingiberaceae

Description: Erect, slender, perennial herb with a thickened, fleshy subterranean rhizome and with one or more aerial leafy stems up to 1.25 m tall. Rhizome fleshy, robust, up to 2 cm thick, growing horizontally underground but at shallow depth. Leaves regularly arranged in two opposite rows, sheath prominently veined. Flowers fragile, short lived, arises direct from rhizome. Fruit a thin-walled capsule, 3 valved, red. Seed small, black and with pulpy cover.
Ecological distribution: Prefers warm, sunny conditions. Grown in tropical Asia, brought to Europe and East Africa by Arab traders from India, introduced to Jamaica.
Parts used: Rhizome.
Traditional uses: Rhizome juice – used against migraine, inflammation of the lining tissue of the nose, throat, and air passages, against spasmodic pain in the bowels and relieve menstrual cramps.
Crushed rhizomes – applied externally against headache, toothache, rheumatism, intestinal problems, itch, boils, swellings and applied as an antidote against snake poison.
Decoctions or poultices – rubbed on the body after childbirth, against swelling and bruises, rheumatism and baths against fever.
Leaves – externally for poulticing to treat headache.
Ginger tea – to prevent hoarseness.
Culinary purposes: as spice and food flavoring.
Indications: For cough, colds; as carminative, for rheumatic complaints.
Special precautions:. Some people may be allergic to ginger oil. Dosage of ginger should not exceed the amounts used in food especially for pregnant and nursing women
Product available: Ginger powder, tea, oil.
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.
Or contact: RED Foundation Inc., Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel no. (63) (049) 536 0205

10. Balanoy (Ocimum basilicum L.)

Common names: Bidai (Ilokano); bouak (Bisaya); basil, sweet basil.

Indications and preparations: Leaf juice for cough, gas pain, toothache, insect bites.

11. Ikmo (Piper betle L.)

Common names: Buyo (Bisaya); betel leaf pepper.

Indications and preparations: Fresh leaves as poultice for swellings, bruises, boils, headache, stomach ache, on the chest for pulmonary complaints.

12. Duhat (Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels)

Common names: Lomboy (Ilokano, Bisaya); Java plum, black plum.

Indications and preparations: Leaf decoction for diarrhea, as mouthwash and for cleansing wounds; ripe fruit for diabetes.

13. Sinta (Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Wallich ex Nees)

Common names: Aluy, lekha (Tagalog); green chireta.

Indications and preparations: Pills or infusion for hypertension; mixed with Orthosiphon aristatus, for diabetes.

14. Chichirika (Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don.)

Common names: Kantutay, amnias (Tagalog); Madagascar periwinkle (English)

Indications and preparations: Decoction for diabetes; alkaloids for cancer chemotherapy.

15. Caimito (Chrysophyllum cainito L.)

Common names: Cainito, star apple

Indications and preparations: Decoction of leaves for diarrhea; fresh fruit for diabetes.

16. Banaba (Lagerstroemia speciosa (L.) Pers.)

Common names: Bugarom (Bisaya).

Indications and preparations: Leaf decoction diuretic and anti-diabetic.

17. Balbas-pusa (Orthosiphon aristatus (Blume) Miq.)

Common names: Kabling-gubat; cat’s whiskers.

Indications and preparations: Leaves and flowers decoction; diuretic, dissolves renal stones; combined with  Andrographis paniculata, for diabetes.

18. Sampa-sampalukan (Phyllanthus niruri L.)

Common names: Tartalikod (Ilokano); yerba de San Pablo (Bisaya); egg-woman, seed-under-leaf.

Indications and preparations: Infusion for diarrhea, diabetes, hepatitis, jaundice; pounded plant poultice for bruises, swellings, open sores.

19. Ampalaya (Momordica charantia (L.) DC)

Common names: Ampalaya (Tagalog); paria (Ilokano); palia (Bisaya); bitter gourd, bitter cucumber, bitter melon (English)

Indications and preparations: anti-diabetic (non-insulin dependent); for fertility regulation.

Family: Cucurbitaceae/ Asteraceae
Description: Monoecious, annual vine up to 5m long. Stem 5-ridged. Leaf blade broadly ovate,deeply palmately-lobed, deeply cordate at base, lobes obovate and sinuate-lobulate or sinuate-toothed, glabrous or sparsely pubescent. Flowers, yellow. Fruit, irregularly warty, orange when ripe, dehiscing. Seeds brown.
Ecological distribution: In lowland rain forest, riverine forest, thickets, hedges, waste places, and roadsides. Domesticated in in eastern India and Southern China.
Parts used: Young leaves: tops.
Traditional uses: Root, stem, fruit, flower decoction – as an agent to reduce fever, diabetes millitusPlant – as laxative, against chronic malariaJuice from plant parts – externally to treat skin disorders, abscesses and burns, diarrhea and stomach-ache.Leaf juice – for jaundice, and menstrual disorders.

Flower – part of a mixture for asthma.

Seed – for chest pains, dysentery, obstructions of liver and spleen, hemorrhoids, chronic malaria, ulcers, breast cancer, mumps, and lumbago.

Roots – expectorant.

Leaf tops and fruits as vegetable.

Special precautions: Blood sugar level should be monitored regularly. The native variety with small bitter fruit is recommended.
Product available: tablets, capsules, tea.
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.
Or contact: RED Foundation Inc., Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel no. (63) (049) 536 0205.

20. Sambong (Blumea balsamifera L. DC)

Common names: Sambong (Tagalog); lakad-bulan (Bikol); Ngai camphor (English).

Indications: Diuretic in hypertension; dissolves kidney stones.

Family: Compositae/Asteraceae

Description: Erect, semi-woody, aromatic herb or shrub about 4 m tall. Leaves alternate, coarse, large with slightly toothed margins. Flowerheads stalked, terminal panicles, yellowish-white flowers numerous.
Ecological distribution: In roadsides, fields, lowland and mountainous regions. From India, Myanmar, South China, Taiwan to Thaiand, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.
Parts used: Leaves and flowering tops.
Traditional uses: leaf decoction – for asthma, bronchitis, respiratory problems in general; stomachic, vermifuge, as bath for women after childbirthleaf juice – for sores, boilsCigarettes containing chopped leaves – to relieve sinusitis.
Special precautions: Avoid using with other diuretics. When taking diuretics, eat at least one banana a day.
Product available: Tablets, capsules and herbal tea
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.
Or contact: RED Foundation Inc., Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel no. (63) (049) 536 0205.

21. Manzanilla (Chrysanthemum indicum L.)

Official name (Filipino): Manzanilla.

Common names: Dolontas (Tagalog); false chamomile, winter aster, Indian chrysanthemum.

Indications and preparations: Flowers macerated in oil for colic, stomach upset.

22. Bayabas (Psidium guavaja L.)

Common names: Guava, bayabas (Tagalog); guyabas (Iloko); Guava (English).

Indications: Antidiarrhea; antiseptic.

Family: Myrtaceae

Description: Shallow-rooted shrub or small tree, up to 10 m tall, branching from the base and often producing suckers. Bark, smooth, green to red brown, peeling off in thin flakes. Leaves opposite and with glands. Flowers solitary or in 2-3 flowered cymes. Fruit a berry, globose. Seeds usually numerous, embedded in pulp, yellowish, 3 – 5 mm long.
Ecological distribution: In parks and gardens. Indigenous to American tropics, originated between Mexico and Peru, to the Philippines and introduced from West to India.
Parts used: Leaves, fruits.
Traditional uses: for diarrhea;Leaf decoction: for washing wounds, skin infections, feminine hygiene; mouthwash.Chopped leaves: to stop bleeding (shallow cuts).Fruits: excellent source of Vitamin C; for making jams and jellies.
Special precautions: Eating too much guava fruit may cause constipation.
Product available: guava powder; herbal tea.
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.
Or contact: RED Foundation Inc., Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel no. (63) (049) 536 0205.

23. Luyang dilaw (Curcuma longa L.)

Common names: Dilaw; (Tagalog); kalabaga (Bisaya); kulyaw (Ilokano); turmeric.

Indications and preparations: Rhizome, ointment for allergic dermatitis; as poultice for gas pain in adults.

Family: Zingiberaceae (Ginger family)

Description: Perennial erect herb that grows to about 1.5 m high, with fleshy and aromatic branched underground stem (rhizome), Leaves are large, about 70 cm long and 20 cm wide. Flowers yellowish-white, fragrant; inflorescence terminal. Rhizome is yellow outside, bright yellow-orange inside.
Ecological distribution: Native to the Indo-Malesian region; in rich, moist soils, in most of Southeast Asia.
Parts used: Rhizomes
Traditional uses: As medicine – juice is applied to bruises, for stomach ache, as antispasmodic; for skin itch and other skin diseases; expels intestinal wormsOther uses: Food color, spice and dye for fabrics and fibers..
Special precautions: As with any other medication, if after using for 3 – 5 days, symptoms persist or there is no sign improvement, consult a doctor.
Product available: Turmeric ointment, turmeric powder.
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.
Or contact: RED Foundation Inc., Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel no. (63) (049) 536 0205.

24. Sampalok (Tamarindus indica L.)

Common names: Sambagi (Bisaya); sambak (Bikol); salomagi (Ilokano); tamarind.

Indications and preparations: Leaf decoction sponge bath in fever and after childbirth; ripe fruit laxative, macerated in water and sweetened a refreshing drink for fever.

25. Paminta (Piper nigrum L.)

Common names: Pimienta (general); black pepper.

Indications and preparations: Decoction of fruits for fever and malaria.

26. Makabuhay (Tinospora  crispa L. Hook f. & Thompson)

Common names: Paliahan (Bisaya).

Indications and preparations: Stem decoction antipyretic, anti-malaria; wash for skin ulcers.

Family: Menispermaceae

Description: A woody climber up to 15 m long, older stems with numerous prominent protrusions. Leaves broadly heart-shaped; flowers with 3 petals; fruit an ellipsoidal drupe, orange, up to 2 cm long. The stem contains a very bitter milky sap.
Ecological distribution: In primary rainforests or mixed deciduous forests throughout the Philippines; in tropical Asia at altitudes up to 1000 m.
Parts used: fresh or dried stem
Traditional uses: An infusion is used to treat fever due to malaria; also for jaundice; and against intestinal worms.
Method of preparation and dosage: Boil chopped stem, 30 g fresh or 25 g dried, in 3 glasses of water for 20 minutes. Strain. Take ½ glass of the decoction twice a day before meals.
Contraindications: Bitter taste not agreeable to most people. Avoid giving to pregnant women and nursing mothers.
Special precautions: Use non-metallic containers for preparing the decoction. As with any medication, proper administration of the designated dose is very important. If no improvement in the patient’s condition is observed after 2 days, discontinue treatment and consult a physician or pharmacist.
Product available:
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.
Or contact: RED Foundation Inc., Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel no. (63) (049) 536 0205.

27. Bawang (Allium sativum L.)

Common names: Ajos (Bisaya); garlic

Indications and preparations: Fresh cloves, capsules for lowering blood cholesterol levels; antiseptic.

Family: Alliaceae

Parts used: Leaves and bulbs (cloves).
Traditional uses: cloves – for lowering blood sugar and cholesterol levels;
externally – for headache, insect bites, ringworm, athlete’s foot, toothache, rheumatism;
decoction – for fever
Special precautions: Avoidtaking with medicines for lowering blood sugar, and medicines for thinning blood. Dosage must not exceed 6-8 cooked cloves a day. Stomach ulcer may develop if garlic is eaten raw.
Description: Erect, low, annual herb, 30-60 cm high. Leaves flat, or V-shaped in transverse section, alternate, arranged in two opposite rows, arising from underground bulbs. Cloves enclosed by papery protective coats. Flowers often imperfect or absent.
Ecological distribution: Cultivatedall over the world. Probably originated from Central Asia.
Product available: tablets, capsules, powder-based extract
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.
Or contact: RED Foundation Inc., Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel no. (63) (049) 536 0205

28. Pansit-pasitan (Peperomia pellucida (L.) Kunth)

Common names: Ulasiman-bato, pansit-pansitan (Tagalog); olasiman-ihalas (Cebu,Bisaya); tangon-tangon (Bikol); peperomia (English).

Indications and preparations: Infusion, decoction or salad for gout and rheumatic pains; pounded plant warm poultice for boils and abscesses.

Family: Piperaceae

Description: Small fleshy herb up to 30 cm tall. Stem initially erect, rooting at nodes, glabrous. Leaves spirally arranged, simple and membranous when dry. Flowers bisexual, without a stalk, floral bracts rounded. Fruit fleshy, one-seeded.
Ecological distribution: in disturbed habitats, in gardens and cultivated areas that are damp and lightly shaded, on damp hard surfaces such as walls, roofs, steep gullies, and in flower pots. Native to South America, common in South-East Asia, naturalized widely in the Old World tropics.
Parts used: Aerial plant parts.
Traditional uses: Whole plant – as warm poultice to treat abscesses, boils and pimples, rheumatism and fatigue.
bruised leaf – for headache, convulsions.
infusion or decoction-against gout, kidney troubles, rheumatic pain, externally as rinse for complexion problems.
Leaf juice – for colic and abdominal pains.
Eaten as fresh salad.
Special precautions: Avoid using with other pain relievers, diuretics.
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.
Or contact: RED Foundation Inc., Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel no. (63) (049) 536 0205.

29. Siling labuyo (Capsicum frutescens L.)

Common names: Sili labuyo (Tagalog); Capsicum pepper, chili bird pepper, bird’s eye chili (English).

Indications: Counter-irritant.

Family: Solanaceae

Description: An annual herb or subshrub 0.5-1.5 m tall, erect much branched. Stem irregularly angular to to subterete up to 1 cm in diameter, green to brown-green with purplish spots near nodes . Leaves alternate, simple and very variable. Flowers usually borne singly, terminal. Fruit a non- pulpy berry, very variable in size, shape, color, and degree of pungency, up to 30 mm long green, yellow, cream or purplish when immature, red orange, yellow brown when mature.
Ecological distribution: New World origin, originated in South America, introduced and cultivated throughout South-East Asia. They grow at a wide range of altitudes, with rainfall between 600-1250 mm.
Parts used: Leaves, fruits.
Traditional uses: Externally – carminative and antispasmodic in colics; relief of rheumatic pain.Used as spice in cooking.
Special precautions: Capsicum may cause stomach irritation. Should not be taken during pregnancy and lactation.
Product available: Liniment
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.
Or contact: RED Foundation Inc., Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel no. (63) (049) 536 0205.

30. Mayana (Plectranthus scuttelarioides)

Common names: Badiara, malaina (Tagalog); daponaya (Bisaya); painted nettle.

Indications and preparations: Fresh leaves as cataplasm for bruises, contusions, swellings, headache.

Family: Labiatae

Description: An erect, branched perennial herb up to 150 cm tall, commonly cultivated for its ornamental purplish foliage. Flowers small, 8-15 mm long, in irregularly branched clusters, blue or violet with whitish tube; nutlets globose, 1 – 1.2 mm long, shiny brown.
Ecological distribution: In all kinds of habitat; from rainforest to fields, thickets and gardens; from lowland to 2900 m altitude.
Parts used: Leaves
Traditional uses: Internally for diarrhea; against intestinal worms; for delayed menstruation; for hemorrhoids. Externally for swellings, small pox, fresh cuts and sores.
Special precautions: Discontinue medication if it does not seem to be working, or if an allergic reaction occurs.
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.
Or contact: RED Foundation Inc., Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel no. (63) (049) 536 0205.

31. Sabila (Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f.)

Common names: Dilang buwaya, acibar (general); Curacao aloe, aloe.

Indications and preparations: Sap from fresh leaves for alopecia, falling hair, burns, psoriasis, complexion care. Pounded leaves poultice for contusions and localized edema.

32. Niyog-niyogan (Quisqualis indica L.)

Common names: Tartaraok (Tagalog); balitadham (Bisaya); Rangoon creeper, Chinese honeysuckle, liane vermifuge, yesterday, today & tomorrow.

Indications and preparations: Fruit (kernel)anthelmintic; leaves poultice for headache.

Family: Combretaceae
Description: Woody climber up to 8 m, young branchlets sparsely pubescent. Leaves opposite, untire, 7 – 15 cm long. Inflorescence erminal or axillary clusters of fragrant, tubular, showy flowers varying in color from white to pink to red. Petals 10 – 20 mm long. Fruit ellipsoidal, long, with 5 prominent wings lengthwise. Fruit when mature taste like almonds.
Ecological distribution: In forest margins at low altitude, in gardensand backyards. Native to Asian tropics and throughout Malesian region.
Parts used: Fruits.
Traditional uses: root, seed, fruit decoction – used as vermifuge, stop diarrhea;
fruits and seeds – alleviate nephritis, used as bechic or pectoral, against ascaris;
leaf juice – remedy for boils and ulcers;
leaves – relieve ache caused by fever;
roots – treat rheumatism;
fruit decoction – gargle against toothache.
Special precautions: Follow recommended dosage. Overdose causes hiccups.
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.
Or contact: RED Foundation Inc., Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel no. (63) (049) 536 0205.

33. Ipil-ipil (Leucaena leucocephala (Lamk.) de Wit)

Common names: Santa Elena (Tagalog); komkompitis (Ilokano); loyloi (Bisaya).

Indications and preparations: Seeds anthelmintic.

34. Comfrey (Symphytum officinale L.)

Common names: Bruise-wort, bone-set.

Indications and preparations: Crushed leaves, ointment for allergic dermatitis.

35. Akapulko (Senna alata (L.) Roxb.)

Common names: Katanda (Tagalog); andadasi (Ilokano); palochina (Bisaya); ringworm bush, seven golden candlesticks

Indications and preparations: Crushed leaves, ointment for fungal skin infections e.g. tinea flava, ringworm, athlete’s foot

Family: Leguminosae
Description: A shrub, 1-2 m tall, with thick branches, pubescent. Leaves with 8-20 pairs of leaflets oblong-elliptical. Flowers with oblong sepals. Fruit tetragonal, winged and glabrous. Seeds quadrangular, flattened, and shiny.
Ecological distribution: Native to South America, now distributed throughout the tropics; abundantly naturalized in South East Asia, and occasionally planted throughout the region for medicinal and ornamental purposes.
Parts used: Leaves
Traditional uses: root, flower and leaf decoction – used as laxative
pounded leaves – against ringworm
leaf decoction – as an expectorant in bronchitis and dyspnea, as astringent, mouthwash and a wash for eczema.
Special precautions: Apply thinly twice daily on affected part. Improvement should occur 2 – 3 weeks after treatment.
Product available: ointment, lotion, herbal soap.
Further information in: de Padua,L.S., N. Bunyapraphatsara, R.H.M.J. Lemmens (Editors). 1999. Plant Resources of South East Asia 12(1) Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands.771 pp.
Or contact: RED Foundation Inc., Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel no. (63) (049) 536 0205.

My Source: http://www.pcarrd.dost.gov.ph/prosea/proseaherbal/indications_index.htm

Poliomyelitis

Posted on

Poliomyelitis is an infectious disease. It is caused by a virus transmitted from person to person through discharges from the nose and throat and from contamination with human waste.

Poliomyelitis (“polio”), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. The causative agent, a virus called poliovirus (PV), enters the body orally, infecting the intestinal wall. It may proceed to the blood stream and into the central nervous system causing muscle weakness and often paralysis.

Polio (infantile paralysis) is a communicable disease which is categorized as a disease of civilization. Polio spreads through human-to-human contact, usually entering the body through the mouth due to fecally contaminated water or food. The poliovirus is a small RNA (ribonucleic acid) virus that has three different strains and is extremely infectious. The virus invades the nervous system, and the onset of paralysis can occur in a matter of hours. While polio can strike a person at any age, over fifty percent of the cases occurred to children between the ages of three and five. The incubation period of polio, from the time of first exposure to first symptoms, ranges from three to thirty five days.

Polio can spread widely before physicians detect the first signs of a polio outbreak. Surprisingly, most people infected with the poliovirus have no symptoms or outward signs of the illness and are thus never aware they have been infected. After the person is exposed to the poliovirus, the virus is expelled through faeces for several weeks and it is during this time that a polio outbreak can occur in a community. The three strains of poliovirus result in non-paralytic polio, paralytic polio, and bulbar polio. In all forms of polio, the early symptoms of infection are fatigue, fever, vomiting, headache and pain in the neck and extremities.

SYMPTOMS
1. Fever
2. Headache
3. Stiffness of neck and back
4. Paralysis of voluntary muscles, usually of lower extremities.

TREATMENT
1. Isolate child in bed when fever develops and consult a doctor or health worker for treatment
2. Avoid traumas as infections, etc, if confirmed as poliomyelitis.
3. Reoprt eht suspected cases of poliomyelitis in the community to the health authority.

PREVENTION
1. The community should participate in information dissemination regarding poliomyelitis and get involved in local planning of its prevention and immunization activities.
2. Protect children against unnecessary close contact with persons outside the family
3. Avoid unnecessary travel and visiting
4. Report all suspected cases of poliomyelitis in the community to health authoriies.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article “Poliomyelitis”.

Herbal Cures Part 2

Posted on

1. LAGUNDI
This grows anywhere in the country and is used as cure for headache, fever, cough, wound and ulcer. Doctors administering drug preparation out of lagundi reported that the prescribed dosage for fever of viral origin as 75 percent efficacy since it contains elements that inhibit the growth of influenza egg virus.

2. YERBA BUENA
It is widely used as a therapeutic drug. It is said to cure fever, indigestion, influenza, headache, cough, measles, edema, vomiting, asthma etc. The leaves are pounded and formed into a decoction for use internally or externally.

3. GUAVA
It is not only useful as a fruit tree but also as medicine long used by our forefathers. Its leaves are used as aromatic bath for treatment of diarrhea, toothache and vaginal wash. Its unripe fruit is also used along with leaves for ulcers. Doctors say it is 90 to 100 percent effective for diarrhea and colic. Studies show that a decoction of guava leaves is effective for pyorrhea, dental abscess, etc. when it is used as mouthwash.

4. TSAANG GUBAT
Doctors took interest in the use of this after writer-columnist Mario Chanco related how he survived about with dysentery during the Japanese occupation by using a decoction of the plant. Tests conducted by the doctors proved 80 to 100 percent efficacy of tsaang-gubat as anti-diarrhea and anticolic remedy.

5. NIYOG-NYOGAN
The dried fruit of this plant is traditionally used for treatment of intestinal worms, particularly ascaris and tricihina. The fruits are simple chewed after meal. Doctors prescribed a dose of 8 to 10 nuts for adults and 4 to 7 nuts for children as antihelminic treatment for ascaris.

6. IPIL ? IPIL
The powdered seed of ipil-ipil has been found to be effective against pin-worms.

7. AKAPULKO
The juice from crushed leaves of akapulko is used for treatment of ringworm and other fungus infections of the skin. The powdered leaves are rubbed over the affected area 2 to 3 times a day until the infection is removed.

8. SAMBONG
The leaves are used for arthritis, rheumatism, chest pain, cough, gas pain and headache. The leaves are pounded or crushed and mixed with coconut oil. It is good for edema caused by heart or kidney disorders and promotes the loss of water and sodium from the body that is why it is called a diuretic.

Herbal Cures Part 1

Posted on Updated on

SKIN ITCHINESS AND ALLERGY
Herbal Medications:

1. KAKAWATE LEAVES
Crush or chop young leaves and extract juice
Apply the juice on the skin until the itchiness is relieved.

2. KALATSUTSI SAP
Extract the sap or juice from the leaves and trunk mix with coconut oil
Rub the mixture on the affected skin 2 times a day

3. KANYA PISTULA
Crush young leaves
Rub the crushed leaves on the affected area until relieved from itchiness.

SORE THROAT
Herbal Medications

1. LUYA OR GINGER LOZENGES
Wash and peel a small piece of ginger.
Chew slowly for a few minutes. Swallow the juice or keep a small piece in the mouth, chewing it little by little.

2. SABILA LEAVES
Wash leaves and cut in ? inch sizes
Keep in the mouth all day, swallowing the juice. Take another piece when there is no more juice.

3. KAYMITO LEAVES GARGLE
Boil 1 cup of chopped fresh leaves in 2 glasses of water for 10 minutes
Use the decoction as mouthwash or gargle.

4. DUHAT LEAVES MOUTHWASH
Boil 10 chopped fresh leaves in 2 glasses of water for 10 minutes
Use the decoction as mouthwash or gargle.

5. TALONG LEAVES MOUTHWASH
Boil 3 chopped leaves in 2 glasses of water for 10 minutes
Use the decoction as mouthwash or gargle.

SUNBURN AND PRICKLY HEAT
Herbal Medications

1. ALUSIMAN LEAVES
Extract juice from the leaves
Apply on the prickly heat after starch bath

2. BAYABAS LEAVES
If there is infection, boil cup of chopped leaves in one gallon of water.
Add 2 gallons of cold water
ACNE
Herbal Medications

1. RIPE PAPAYA WITH CALAMANSI
Mix three tablespoons of mashed ripe papaya with one tablespoon calamansi juice.
Aoply mixture on the face every after washing. Leave it on for 30 minutes, then wash face with warm water.

2. SABILA LEAVES
Get one leaf and peel the outer covering.
Rub the juice on the face every after washing. Leave it on for 30 minutes.

3. ROMERO LEAVES
Crush 5 leaves and extract the juice.
Apply juice on the face after washing it with warm water.
Leave it on overnight.

RHEUMATISM OR RHEUMATIC JOINT PAIN
Herbal Medications

1. KILAW POULTICE
Chop or crush a rhizome and mix with oil.
Apply on the joint as poultice overnight.

2. MANGO BARK HOT COMPRESS
Boil a piece of chopped bark.
Use the decoction as hot compress.

3. MALABULAK LEAVES AND YOUNG STALKS COMPRESS
Chop leaves and young stalks and put it in a cloth bag
Add ? teaspoon salt.
Warm the bag and apply as compress.

4. LUMBANG BATO LEAVES COMPRESS
Heat the leaves.
Apply on the joints directly while still hot for 15 minutes, 2 times a day.

5. HERBA BUENA LEAVES
Boil 4 tablespoons of dried leaves in 2 cups of water for 15 minutes
Dosage: Adulsts ? glass, every 4 hours.

DIABETES
Herbal Medications

1. Darak (new grounded)
Boil the newly grounded darak. Filter the boiled liquid with a piece of cloth
Drink it like tea with sugar or honey.

COUGH COLDS AND FEVERS
Herbal Medications

1. GINGER, KALAMANSI AND SAMPALOK
Boil about 2 inches (thumb size) of luya in 2 cups boiling water for 15 to 20 minutes to make salabat.
Stain and set aside. Strain pulp of 1 to 2 ripe sampalok.
Add juice of 2 to 3 kalamansi fruites.
Add to salabat and sweeten with sugar or honey
Take every four hours or 3 to 4 times daily.

2. GUMAMELA
Boil gumamela flowers to make a tea.
This tea, made from red gumamela flowers, is an expectorant for bronchitis.

3. SAMBONG
Boil sambong leaves to make a tea.
Leaf decoction is an expectorant.
Take one glass every four hours.

4. Oregano
Leaf infusion is a cure for asthma. Juice from leaves with added sugar is given to children with respiratory problems like cough, asthma and bronchitis.
Boil two cups water for every handful of dried material or three handfuls of fresh ones.
Cover for about 15 to 20 minutes, strain and flavor with sugar if desired.

5. KAMPANITULOT
Decoction or wine infusion of the whole plant is prescribed for intermittent fever.
The juice of 20 to 40 leaves, extracted with water and a little wine is good for children with coughs, cols and asthma.

6. DAMONG MARIA
Decoction of leaves and flowers used as expectorant. It should however, not be given to those suffering from gastric ulcers, gastric intestinal inflammation and typhoid fever.
Boil about 40 fresh leaves with flowering tops (10 g) in 3 cups of water, for 15 to 20 minutes until you get 1 glass of the greenish tea solution. Drink while warm; dose good for one day use to be taken twice.

7. ALAGAW
Boil 8 to 10 fresh or dried leaves in 8 glasses water for 15 minutes. Strain. For adults, one glass of the mixture is recommended four times a day.

8. LAGUNDI
Boil 5 to six dried leaves or 8 to 10 fresh leaves in one glass water for 15 minutes or until you get ? glass of the solution. Strain and give ? to ? glasses every four hours to adults.

 

Herbal Remedies

Posted on

ABSCESSES AND BOILS
ALUGBATI LEAVES
Preparation: Crush two leaves
Application: Apply as poultice twice a day

Crush two Alugbati leaves, apply as pultice twice a day

BURNS
SABILA LEAVES
Preparation: Wash leaves with soap and water. Pound the leaves and extract juice.
Application: Apply on the burn area after soaking in warn salt solution once a day.

CONSTIPATION
KILAW LEAVES
Preparation: Pound the rhizomes.
Application: Massage the extracted juice on the scalp and hair. Leave it on over night and shampoo the next morning

ECZEMA
CACAO SEEDS POULTICE
Preparation: Roast ten seeds and pound.
Application: Apply as poultice to affected areas after hot foot bath or hot compress.

HEMORRHOIDS
KAMIAS LEAVES
Preparation: Boil three cups of chopped fresh leaves in two gallons of water for 10 minutes. Strain.
Application: Use this decoction for hot sitz bath.

MUMPS
KANTUTAY LEAVES
Preparation: Pound or chop the leaves.
Application: Apply directly as poultice on the swollen gland for 30 minutes, 3 times a day.

SCABIES
KAKAWATE LEAVES
Preparation: Extract juice from leaves.
Application: Apply on the affected parts after taking a bath, and at bedtime.

SORE THROAT
BAWANG LOZENGES
Preparation: Wash one piece and peel.
Application: Keep in the mouth for sometime, chewing it slowly. Swallow juice.

SUNBURN AND PRICKLY HEAT
ALUSIMAN LEAVES
Preparation: Extract juice from the leaves.
Application: Apply on the prickly heat after starch bath.

ASTHMA
TALUMPUNAY LEAVES
Preparation: roll 2 dried leaves
Application: Use as cigarette every six hours.

ATHLETE?S FOOT
REBANUS TUBERS
Preparation: Chop tubers and extract juice
Application: Apply juice on the affected parts, 2 times a day

HERPES
KALATSUTSI
Preparation: Extract juice from the leaves
Application: Apply directly on the lesions, 3 times a day.

RHEUMATISM OR RHEUMATIC JOINT PAIN
MANGGA BARK HOT COMPRESS
Preparation: Boil a piece of shopped bark
Application: Use the decoction for hot compress

DKIN ERUPTIONS AND DERMATITIS
COMFREY LEAVES
Preparation: Crush leaves and extract the juice.
Application: Apply the juice on the affected skin, 3 times a day.

SNAKE BITES
KAMANTIGUE FLOWERS
Preparation: crush about 10 flowers
Application: Apply directly on the wound as poultice after it has been bled.

TOOTHACHE
KATAKA-TAKA LEAVES
Preparation: Crush young leaves
Application: Apply directly on swollen face.

UNDERARM BODY ODOR
BUYO ? KALAMANSI DEODORANT
Preparation: Extract juice from buyo leaves and mix with kalamansi (citrus) juice.
Application: Apply as deodorant every bath and at bedtime.

WORM IFESTATION
NIYUG-NIYOGAN SEEDS
Preparation: For adults, 10 seeds. For children 4 to 7 yrs old, 4 seeds. For children 8 to 9 years old, 6 seeds. For children 10 to 12 years old, 7 seeds.
Application: Eat raw 2 hours after supper. Repeat after one week if needed.